CEA News




Latest and archived news from the Centre for Extragalactic Astronomy at Durham University.

Head over to our Vimeo channel for videos connected to our research.

A link to the past: connecting local elliptical galaxies and high-redshift starbursts

Jack Birkin, September 2020

In order to understand the nature of galaxies in our local Universe, we need to look to their predecessors billions of light years in the past. At these early times galaxies were typically younger and far more active than they are...

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Hidden in Plain Sight: Monster Black Holes Found in Nearby Galaxies

Dave Alexander, July 2020

NASA’s NuSTAR satellite has observed the faintest growing supermassive black holes in our cosmic backyard, and found that some of them are actually luminous “monsters” hiding behind thick clouds of dust and gas. These growing black holes are faint and weak based upon their X-ray emission at low energies. However, emission in wavebands other than X-rays...

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Enhanced compact AGN radio emission in red quasars

Vicky Fawcett, April 2020

The majority of the quasar population are blue at optical wavelengths, typically due to an obscured view of the supermassive black hole accretion disc. However, there is a small but significant subset with redder optical- infrared (IR) colours (coined as “red QSOs”)...

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Triple Rollover: a third lensed source for the Jackpot system

Russell Smith, April 2020

Gravitational lensing -- the deflection of light rays from distant sources by objects along the line-of-sight -- is an invaluable tool to learn about the distribution of mass in the intervening galaxies...

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Studying the most luminous galaxies in the Universe

Ian Smail, March 2020

The most actively star-forming galaxies in the Universe frequently hide their activity behind obscuring clouds of soot-like dust. Initially formed in the atmospheres of massive stars as they age, the dust absorbs much of the starlight from these distant galaxies...

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Exploring the jungle with VLT-MUSE

Rich Bielby, January 2020

When people talk about galaxies, we often think of the luminous matter, i.e. the stars and maybe the dense clouds of gas illuminated by stars. However much of a galaxy's baryonice mass is contained not in the stuff we can see, but in massive clouds of unilluminated gas. The obvious earth bound comparison here is with icebergs: what we see is only the tip....

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